Teaching & Learning

Teaching and Learning – Our Learning Cycle

 

TEEP
  

At De Lacy Academy, we have based our learning on the TEEPs cycle. There are six parts to the learning cycle:

  • Prepare for learning
  • Agree Learning Outcomes
  • Present New Information
  • Clarify understanding
  • Apply
  • Review

Each part follows in the cycle – building the learning and securing independence for students as the cycle supports what they learn and understand. A learning cycle may take part of a lesson, a whole lesson or even a series of lessons in practical subjects. The key is that students know what they are learning and the method is used in every faculty – making it a consistent way of learning for students.

This is what the TEEPs model looks like.

 

We have adapted the above and created our own cycle - which is used in every lesson and can be seen in the back cover of all our exercise books.

 

Cycle

 Prepare is about setting the scene where the learning will take place.

Agree learning outcomes is a dialogue with students to see what they will be able to do at the end of the lesson that they cannot currently do.

Present New Information is the ‘hook’ of the lesson – the new learning that keeps students engaged.

Clarify understanding is where students have a go at a task to clarify whether they have understood the new learning. This is the main part of the cycle to monitor learning.

Apply is where pupils show they have mastered a skill. This is where they demonstrate independently that they have learnt something and can apply the knowledge without help from the teacher.

Review is where pupils can unpick what they have learnt and think about their new skills. This leads on to the beginning of the cycle again.

 

This consitent approach to lessons gives confidence to both pupils and staff in terms of the lesson structure and what to expect next. Most classrooms have a copy of the TEEPs cycle on the wall, and many faculties use a common slide on the whiteboard to show which part of the cycle the lesson is at.

lesson slide

 

 

Some faculties have developed this slide further and customised it for their specific needs, but the principle remains the same.